Tracie Keesee (NYPD) : Wiki,Bio,Family

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Who is Tracie L. Keesee? Dr Tracie L. Keesee Keesee is a 25 year veteran of the police force. She retired as captain of the Denver Police Department, where her last assignment was as deputy director of the Colorado Information Analysis Center (CIAC), the fusion center for the state of Colorado.

Tracie Keesee (NYPD) : Wiki,Bio,Family

Dr. Keesee is also the Co-Founder and Director of Research Partnerships for the Center for Policing Equity, which promotes police transparency and accountability by facilitating innovative research collaborations between law enforcement agencies and empirical specialists in law enforcement. social sciences, and seeks to improve issues of equity – especially racial and gender equity – in policing, both within law enforcement agencies and between agencies and communities that ‘they serve.

Co-Founder and Director of Research Partnerships Tracie L. Keesee, Ph.D., is co-founder of the Center for Policing Equity. She is also the Project Director of the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, a Department of Justice project led by the National Network for Safe Communities at John Jay College. The initiative aims to improve relationships and increase trust between minority communities and the criminal justice system, as well as to advance public and scholarly understanding of the issues that contribute to these relationships.

Dr. Keesee holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Metropolitan State College, academic certifications in public policy and public administration from the University of Colorado at Denver, a master’s degree in criminal justice from the University of Colorado at Denver and a PhD from the University of Denver in Intercultural Communications. She graduated from the 203rd Class of the FBI National Academy. Mr. Keesee has published several articles on various collected anthologies and peer-reviewed scientific journals.

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She retired as captain of the Denver Police Department, where her last assignment was as deputy director of the Colorado Information Analysis Center (CIAC), the fusion center for the state of Colorado. She is the project director of the National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice, a Department of Justice project led by the National Network for Safe Communities at John Jay College. The initiative aims to improve relationships and increase trust between minority communities and the criminal justice system, as well as to advance public and scholarly understanding of the issues that contribute to these relationships. Mr. Keesee is also Co-Founder and Director of Research Partnerships for the Center for Policing Equity, which promotes police transparency and accountability by facilitating innovative research collaborations between law enforcement agencies and empirical specialists in law enforcement. social sciences, and seeks to improve issues of equity – particularly racial and gender equity – in policing, both within law enforcement agencies and between agencies and communities that ‘they serve.

Meet Dr Tracie Keesee, the woman at the head of the nypd training

The NYPD is engaged in a program to strengthen community-police relations, and the head of this progressive program is a trailblazer herself. Tracie Keesee is the first black woman in decades to lead the formation of the department.

The NYPD is engaged in a program to strengthen community-police relations, and leading this progressive program is a trailblazer herself. Tracie Keesee is the first black woman in decades to lead the formation of the department.

Dr. Keese is the NYPD’s new Deputy Commissioner of Training, and behind the proverbial blue wall and shield of the NYPD lies a complex and dynamic police training program under her leadership.

“I think by having me here and having the experience, I think I bring a bit of that insider perspective from the outside,” said Dr Keesee.

With 27 years of law enforcement and a deep dedication to bridging the gap between the police and the communities they serve, Keesee aims to bring more balance, accountability and perspective to the ranks with the help of new technologies and research.

“What I don’t want people to think is that training is your answer to everything because it isn’t,” Keesee said. “You have to have the right person, that person not only has to have the right training, they have to have the right supervision and the right direction, all of those things have to be in play.”

“To protect and to serve” are three simple words that encompass a complex burden of responsibility.

The NYPD and police departments across the country are still grappling with recent high-profile cases of excessive force such as Ramarley Graham, Eric Garner and Akai Gurley.

“It’s not just about bridging the gap, but also understanding the historical experiences of communities and what we are specifically talking about are communities of color,” Keesee said. “How does their education, their socialization, how does that impact how they think they should be police, or how they think they should interact with you? “

Inside the state-of-the-art facility in Queens, procedures are recreated as real life scenarios. Recruits can not only learn how to better engage with audiences, but also where the fine line lies between implicit and unconscious biases.

“We are talking about issues that are very uncomfortable not only for the police, but also for society in general,” Keesee said. “One of the concerns of officers and the fears they have is being called racists, it’s a reality, it works in their daily thinking in the way they approach and how they interact. , the only thing we’re not going to do here is exacerbate it. “

Reflecting on the past year in her new role as Deputy Commissioner of Training, Keesee says some of these techniques and initiatives are just a baseline for more progressive programs to come.

“Coming here not only allows me to go further, but also to push things further,” said Keesee. “We know we’re doing a great job, the question is whether it’s effective, it’s something very few departments ask of us, but it’s something the community asks of us. “

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