Brock Little: Wiki, Bio, Wife, Wikipedia

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Who is Brock Little?

Brock Little: Wiki, Bio, Wife, Wikipedia

Brock James Little or well-known as Brock Little (born on March 17, 1967, in Haleiwa, Hawaii) is A Surfing Legend and Stunt Performer. brock is an actor and stuntman who served as a stuntman for the TV series John from Cincinnati. He performed early stunts in the 1998 film, In God’s Hands. He also worked on Training Day and Live Free or Die Hard. Brock Little had Died on February 18, 2016, in Oahu, Hawaii, USA because of liver cancer.

About

Actor and stuntman who worked on the television series John from Cincinnati as the stunt coordinator.
He also contributed to Live Free or Die Hard and Training Day.

Before fame

In God’s Hands, a 1998 film, he performed his first stunts.

Brock Little’s achievement

He directed stunts for several television films, including Special Delivery and Flirting with Forty.

Family life

In Haleiwa, Hawaii, he was born.

Associated with

He was a stunt performer for Shia LaBeouf’s Transformers: Dark of the Moon in 2011.

Height

Brock little is 5′ 11″, or (1.8 m) in meter.

Biography

Brock Little was a renowned big wave surfer, taking off on 30′ and larger waves at Waimea Bay in Hawaii and Mavericks in California, in addition to his stunt work in films.
He was a legendary big-wave pioneer, one of the first to challenge the “unridden realm” of waves over 30′ tall, at a time when such waves were thought to be unsurfable.

Childhood and Surfing Career

Brock was born in Northern California, but his parents relocated to Oahu’s North Shore when he was a baby. The northern hemisphere was hit by a weather phenomenon known as El Nino in the winter of 1983, and as a result, massive waves battered the shoreline of Oahu for months on end. This provided an opportunity for several young surfers to hone their skills on big waves.

Brock was one of those surfers, and by the end of the winter, he had transformed himself into a fearless and skilled big wave surfer. Most importantly, people began to take notice of him and his big wave efforts.

As a result, he was invited to the world’s most prestigious big-wave competition at the time, the 1990 Quicksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau event at Waimea Bay.

Brock will be remembered for riding two waves during that event. The first was the largest wave of the competition. He would have won the event if he had ridden that wave all the way to the end. Instead, he collapsing and taking a sickening wipe-out. The images were broadcast all over the world.

The second event was a tube ride, which was possibly the largest tube ride ever attempted in the world up to that point. Brock fell inside the tube after slipping. He’d have won $50,000 if he’d ridden that wave.

Brock continued to push the limits of big wave surfing in Hawaii, and for a few years, he pursued his dream of becoming a sponsored surfer. His desire for thrills eventually led him to Hollywood, where he worked as an award-winning stuntman for many of the time’s action films.

With the introduction of the successful and adventurous World Surf League Big Wave Tour in recent years, the sport of big wave surfing has taken a few giant leaps. While Brock had no involvement in this, many of the world’s best big wave surfers regarded him as an inspiration and influence on their surfing and careers. Brock was quiet and humble, carried himself with dignity, and when the waves got big, he was a total charger out in the ocean.

The Death of Brock Little and The Brock Swell

The surfing world was taken aback when he announced on Instagram that he had liver cancer and that his health was deteriorating. He had a brief battle with the disease before passing away on February 18, 2016, surrounded by friends and family.

A massive swell rumbled into Waimea Bay on Thursday, February 25, 2016. People began referring to it as the ‘Brock Swell’ as soon as it appeared. It arrived just in time for the Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau event at Waimea Bay, which had made Brock famous and shaped him into the man he became.

This ‘Brock Swell’ was a ferocious swell, with the contest venue, Waimea Bay, frequently closing out and proving to be nearly unsurfable whenever the big sets rumbled through.

Nonetheless, after some trepidation among the world’s elite big wave surfers, someone said “Brock Would Go,” a play on the advertising slogan “Eddie Would Go” that surrounds this event.

Every big wave surfer on the planet knew or was friendly with Brock. At the very least, they admired him, and it resulted in every surfer paddling out in those massive conditions, during the best swell in a decade – the ‘Brock Swell.’

Hawaiian surfer John John Florence eventually won the event, earning his first big wave title in the process. When a Hawaiian surfer won the event, it appeared that everything was right with the world, while all eyes were on one of the greatest Hawaiian big wave surfers of all time.

RIP: Rest In Peace

Hawaiian big-wave legend passes away from cancer at the age of 48

We regret to inform you of the death of North Shore surfer Brock Little, who died on February 18, at the age of 48.
Little revealed last month on social media that he was battling advanced cancer.

Little was born in Napa, California in 1967, and his family moved to Haleiwa when he was three years old. He began surfing at the age of seven.
As a teenager, Little was regarded as one of the most talented and hard-charging surfers of his generation, and he was a fixture at Waimea and Mavericks.
He finished fourth in the Eddie event in 1986, when he was only 19 years old, cementing his reputation as a fearless competitor.
Only a few years later, in 1990, he finished second in the prestigious competition, despite some of the most harrowing conditions ever seen.

“Although Little finished second to Hawaiian surfer Keone Downing in the 1990 Quiksilver contest, held in spectacular 25 to 30-foot Waimea surf, he stole the show with a gladiatorial wipeout on the day’s biggest wave, and followed up by pulling into the tube on a 20-footer—a rarity in big-wave surfing at the time—and nearly making it out,” wrote Matt Warshaw in the Encyclopedia of Surfing.

While searching for massive surf in the coming decades, Little also began a career as a stuntman, appearing in films such as Tropic Thunder, Training Days, and Transformers, to name a few.

He was also a frequent contributor to SURFER and Surfing magazines, penning over 30 articles.

When he announced on his Instagram account nearly a month ago that he was battling cancer, the surf community rallied around the icon.
Kelly Slater wrote on Twitter today, after learning of Little’s death, that Little was “larger than life to me.”
My familiar world will never be the same again.
Man, I adore you.
Thank you…”

Even as Little’s health deteriorated, he maintained a positive attitude and was open about his condition.
He gave his final interview with SURFER a few weeks ago, where he discussed a life spent chasing big waves and his thoughts on his legacy in the surf world.

Little wrote on his Instagram account yesterday that he was “lucky to be surrounded by love” in his last public statement.

Little was a true sporting legend who will be sorely missed.

Brock Notes on His Cancer

“To my Instagram friends, if you didn’t already know- I don’t look at or run my Instagram, but that changes today, my brother @clarklittle set up the account & my good friend @420 north (jess) did me a great favor & showed the Instagram world I’m alive & having fun!”
I’m not sure how interested I’ll be in Instagram, but everything you see posted will be from me from now on.
I adore Brock.”

He wrote today, “I have cancer.”
It stinks, but I’m on chemo.
You do your best.
I can’t believe that’s me in the picture.
When I look in the mirror, I don’t recognize myself.”

Who doesn’t adore the classy, handsome, and hilariously funny Hawaiian?

Let’s take a look at Brock’s career as documented in Matt Warsaw’s Encyclopedia of Surfing.

“Unflinching big-wave surfer and world traveler from Haleiwa, Hawaii; runner-up in the Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau contest at Waimea Bay in 1990.”
Little was born in Napa, California in 1967, moved to Hawaii with his family when he was three, and began surfing at the age of seven.
He finished fourth in the Menehune division of the 1980 US Surfing Championships; just over six years later, the 145-pound pencil-legged rookie pro finished fourth in the 1986 Quiksilver event, held in ragged 20-foot surf at Waimea.
Clyde Aikau, Mark Foo, and Ken Bradshaw, the three surfers who finished ahead of him, were 37, 28, and 34 years old, respectively.

“Although Little finished second to Hawaiian surfer Keone Downing in the 1990 Quiksilver contest, held in spectacular 25 to 30-foot Waimea surf, he stole the show with a gladiatorial wipeout on the day’s biggest wave and followed up by pulling into the tube on a 20-footer—a rarity in big-wave surfing at the time—and nearly making it out.
Little’s relaxed, loose-armed demeanor added to his big-wave bravado.
In peer polls conducted in 1990 and 1993, Little and fellow Hawaiian Darrick Doerner have named the best Waimea riders.
Little went on to win most of the big-wave competitions over the next few years.

Brock was the informal mentor to a slightly younger generation of Hawaiian big-wave surfers, including Todd Chesser and Shane Dorian, and was the most vocal proponent of the idea that big-wave riding, rather than being a spiritual exercise or a test of character, was just hugely fun.

“From 1989 to 1997, Little wrote nearly 30 articles for Surfer and Surfing magazines, primarily travel stories and big-wave features.
He was the informal mentor to a slightly younger generation of Hawaiian big-wave surfers, including Todd Chesser and Shane Dorian, and was the most vocal proponent of the idea that big-wave riding, rather than being a spiritual exercise or a test of character, was just hugely fun.

“On December 23, 1994, Little and fellow Hawaiian big-wave rider Mark Foo both rode Mavericks for the first time.
Around noon, Foo wiped out on a 15- foot wave while dropping in; Little and California big-wave rider Mike Parsons wiped out on the wave following and were washed into a nearshore rock out-cropping, where they both struggled mightily to get free and make it ashore. Meanwhile, Foo had been pushed to the bottom and drowned.

“People believe that is one of the worst ways to die, but it isn’t.
Last year, I was held underwater for so long that everything went black and these red dots flashed in the darkness.
Then I went from fighting to just relaxing — I never panic, I fight; there’s a big difference.
After a while, I simply swam up.
So I realized that if I die underwater, I’ll die relaxed. I’m not too concerned about it.
If I die surfing, people shouldn’t feel bad.”

“Working regularly as a Hollywood stuntman since 1999, Little has appeared in over 20 films, including Pearl Harbor (2001), Live Free or Die Hard (2007), and Tropic Thunder (2008). He was a Screen Actors Guild Award nominee for his work in 2009’s Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen.”

Once asked by Matt Warshaw if he ever feared drowning, Brock said: “People think that would be one of the worst ways to die, but it isn’t. Last year, I was held underwater for so long that everything went black and these red dots flashed in the darkness.
Then I went from fighting to just relaxing — I never panic, I fight; there’s a big difference.
And after a while I just swam up. So I realized that if I die underwater, I’ll die relaxed. I’m not worried about it that much. If I die surfing, people shouldn’t feel bad.”

Warshaw also asked if he had some kind of death wish.
“No, not at all. It’s just that if I get myself into a radical experience—getting in a fight, or driving fast, or riding a huge wave—and live through it, I’m totally stoked. I don’t mind bleeding. I don’t mind getting held underwater. I’ve walked away from everything that’s happened so far and been better off every time.”

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